UCLA, Charles E. Young Research Library

Los Angeles, California

Project Info
UCLA, Charles E. Young Research Library
Los Angeles, California
Completion: 2011
Square Footage: 60,000 renovation
LEED CI Gold Certified
Awards: 2012, Design Award, Southern California Development Forum (SCDF)

Designed in the 1960s by renowned architect A. Quincy Jones, the Charles E. Young Research Library serves as the primary library for UCLA graduate students and faculty in humanities and social sciences, and it houses the administrative offices of the UCLA library system. The building required upgrades to meet the needs of its users, expand the library’s offerings, and update the library’s physical environment.

Perkins+Will provided pre-design, programming, and design services for the 60,000 square foot (5,575 square meter) renovation of the first floor and A Level, focusing on the public areas to create flexible, aesthetically appealing spaces, introduce technological improvements, and improve the circulation and function.
Challenges of the project included creating an information-rich, technologically-empowered social center for the campus while understanding and relating to the original concepts of this significant piece of architecture. Additionally, the wall-like nature of the enclosing brise soleil and site fencing were addressed to allow more daylight to reach into the deep floor plan.

Designed in the 1960s by renowned architect A. Quincy Jones, the Charles E. Young Research Library serves as the primary library for UCLA graduate students and faculty in humanities and social sciences, and it houses the administrative offices of the UCLA library system. The building required upgrades to meet the needs of its users, expand the library’s offerings, and update the library’s physical environment.

Perkins+Will provided pre-design, programming, and design services for the 60,000 square foot (5,575 square meter) renovation of the first floor and A Level, focusing on the public areas to create flexible, aesthetically appealing spaces, introduce technological improvements, and improve the circulation and function.

Challenges of the project included creating an information-rich, technologically-empowered social center for the campus while understanding and relating to the original concepts of this significant piece of architecture. Additionally, the wall-like nature of the enclosing brise soleil and site fencing were addressed to allow more daylight to reach into the deep floor plan.