Announcements

Life Science Development Gets a Boost in New York

InnoLabs Breaks Ground in Long Island City

We’re celebrating a huge win for life sciences in New York. On December 5, architects from our New York studio broke ground on InnoLabs, a 266,800 SF life-science building in Long Island City, along with our partners King Street Properties and GFP Real Estate, and city government officials from New York City Economic Development Corporation (EDC).

InnoLabs will have many of the desirable amenities for life-science companies. Our design focuses on enhancing the tenant experience with innovative, modern lab/office space, welcoming collaboration areas, flexible event space, secure bike storage, and lockers. Located on Court Square, the six-story building is just steps away from dining, cultural, and lifestyle destinations for a true live, work, and play experience.

InnoLabs is slated for completion in the first quarter of 2021 and is targeting LEED Silver Certification.

Managing Director Bill Harris attended the groundbreaking ceremony, along with representatives from King Street Properties, GFP Real Estate and New York City Economic Development Corporation.
The project has been several years in the making and indicates significant movement toward the long-time vision of New York as a prime location for the life sciences industry.
Collaboration space at the InnoLabs building in Long Island city.
Modern office/lab space.
Collaboration/event areas and innovative, modern lab spaces enhance the tenant experience for life-science companies.
“This project is a major commitment to this industry’s growth by an experienced development team with members from both New York and Boston, where the model for success with this typology exists with Perkins and Will leading the design efforts to foster its potential. This validates life science development in New York, particularly in Long Island City, and hopefully will act as a springboard to greater demand for space and corresponding development of industry and capacity.”

–Matt Malone, science and technology practice leader in the New York studio